Xerox 914

914

Created: February 8, 2015 6:29 pm by Admin
Modified: July 14, 2017 7:43 am by Admin

The Xerox 914 was the first automatic office copier in the world, and the production of the machine started in September 1959 by Haloid Xerox. This was a floor model which could produce seven copies a minute. The machine was the result of Chester F. Carlson's work in the xerographic process. 914 was one of the most successful Xerox products ever, a 914 model could make 100,000 copies per month. The weight of the machine was 648 pounds and measures 42" high x 46" wide x 45" deep.

Haloid Xerox named the 914 because it could copy originals up to 9 inches by 14 inches (229 mm × 356 mm).

The 914 tend to catch fire because of overheating. Because of this problem, Haloid Xerox provided a "scorch eliminator", which was actually a small fire extinguisher, along with the copier.

This is the first commercial of the 914 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xZYcWsh8t0

Xerox made four versions of the machine: 914, 420, 720 and 1000. The only difference being the motor speed. The 914 could make 7 copies a minute while the 1000 could make 17 copies a minute.

To the left is a picture of a Xerox 720.

If you have more information about this model, or have brochures / pictures, please leave a reply in the form below, or send an email to xeroxnostalgia@outlook.com

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Daryle Lessard
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Daryle Lessard

This was the first machine I was trained on in 1971. We then transitioned to the 720, and later retrofitted the 720 to a 1000. The name 914 indicates 9 X 14 paper, 720 and 1000 indicates copies per hour. Today we print at 180 prints per minute, or over 10,000 per hour, and we don’t call them copies anymore, but prints, because they are processed digitally and laser imaged.
We called the 914 “dial a fire” due to its habit of burning copies in the oven fuser.

Louise Klinke Øhrstrøm
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Louise Klinke Øhrstrøm

Hi Daryle (and anyone who might be able to help me). I am a Danish writer, and I am really excited about finding this website since I am currently writing a novel that is set in California i 1974. I would like one of the characters to work with repairing Xerox machines (driving out to customers to help them with any problems). Would that be realistic? Do you know of people that had that profession? And if yes, what would be the main problems people would have with their machines? Also, do you think it would be realistic that a… Read more »

Don
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Don

The 914 did not catch fire due to overheating.
The paper caught fire if it got jammed under the fuser. Generally if you didn’t open up the machine it just smoldered. The little fire extinguisher was only included with the original machines and most were removed in the late 60’s.

Richard McKinley
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Richard McKinley

One of my duties with the 7th Admin Co, 7th Infantry Div in Korea in 1965-66 was to be the “Key Operator” for our new Fuji Xerox 914. (Partnership between Fuji and Xerox supplied Asia) The US Army had six 914’s in all of South Korea in 1965. Service was provided by one Fuji Xerox Tech Rep living in Seoul which required a two hour bus trip to our post at Camp Casey. Therefore, he taught me some of the simple basic repairs. In 1976, long after my military service, I was hired as a Tech Rep for Xerox Corp… Read more »

Kim Vernon
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Kim Vernon

Good afternoon. I have been trawling the internet for years trying to find information from the earlier days of RX history and today I landed on this website. Soopa! Started in circa 1965, as an apprentice technician, at Park Royal. Training facility moving to Uxbridge ( first Xerox dept there ). Year 2 saw 813 & 914 family training which then led to 2400/3600. Back to Manchester year 3. Initially a walking eng. city centre and then on to a minivan and an area. Quickly left 813/914 and specialised on 3600’s ( all 2400’s had been converted by 69 ).… Read more »

Graham
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Graham

I can help with that 3600 circuit diagram .. if it’s not too late !!

Marcos Campechano García
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Marcos Campechano García

Fui técnico de Xerox de 1973 a 1984 en las cuidaddes de Coatzacoalcos, Mérida, Campeche y Villahermosa Teníamos las series 813, 660, 720, 914, 1000, 3600, 7000, 4000, 3100, 3107, 1860

Erik Ohlson
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Erik Ohlson

914s did not catch fire “due to overheating”, they caught fire when paper stopped under the fuser (which melted the toner, fixing the image). If paper paused under the fuser which had red-hot wires for heat, the paper burned.

Erik Ohlson
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Erik Ohlson

I worked on a large number of Xerox products including the 914 and it’s derivatives, 813, 660, 2400, 3600, 3600 III, and 7000. Also Copyflo 24inch & 11 inch, and 1824 engineering print products, also an automatic-feed engineering print machine a lot like a larger 914 – the name escapes me just now. I was one of the very few Techs trained on the Xerox 3-2-1 and 1-2-3 products line which died a-borning, I also worked on 4000 copiers. Later I switched to the newly-formed Printing Systems division, working on the 1200 computer printer and the CFP ‘Computer Forms Printer’… Read more »

David Wood
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David Wood

The 914 – 1000 series machines used a puff of air ( a solenoid and diaphragm coupled to a manifold) to blow the lead edge of the paper off the drum after image transfer. If this did not happen a photocell; called a “misspuff detector” would stop the machine; an all too common occurrence. At company social events wives were heard to ask “Who is this “Miss Puff”my husband is ALWAYS talking about.

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[…] The Xerox 914. Image Credit: Xerox Nostalgia […]

Massimiliano Brizzi
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Massimiliano Brizzi

tecnico xerox dal 1975 al 2016 41 anni e 3 mesi assistito 914,422, ecc ecc ecc un saluto a tutti Brizzi Massimiliano Italy

George Oklesh
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George Oklesh

I started with Xerox in 1973, Akron, Ohio, as the BIC (Branch Inventory Coordinator), working in the branch refurbishing center. Our breakfast usually consisted of toast made on the 914 fuser.

Roy
Guest
Roy

Hi George. I see you still have your sense of humor. Hope all is well. Regards, Roy Roberts Kingman, AZ

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[…] The Xerox 914. Image Credit: Xerox Nostalgia […]

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[…] Xerox 914 tenía esa numeración en su nombre porque podía copiar documentos originales a un tamaño de 9×14 pulgadas, lo que son 229 x 356 milímetros. Se trataba de un gigantesco mueble de copiado, con un peso de […]

Dave
Guest
Dave

My first job at Howard Kennedy and Rossi in Cavendish Sq Lonodn 1972 to 1974 had a 720 in 1972. Burning smell if you opened the doors too fast after a fuser jam A massive clunking machine. I went to Euston Rd Xerox for Key Operator Training. Watching the Xerox engineers work here and at other offices I worked at, inspired me to take my C & G in Electronics and also become an engineer from 1980 to 1995 on Toshiba copiers