Xerox 4000

In 1970 Xerox introduced the convenience copier Xerox 4000. It was a compact and quite copier, with two paper trays. This was the first copier in the world, that could copy on both sides automatically. The machine was also well suited for copying from bound volumes. Its exposure platen came right up to the edge of the machine allowing individual pages to be copied without having to open the book hat.

Later on the 4000 was produced with automatic or semi-automatic document feed, wich was a great success, especially in business offices for copying multipage unbound documents. This one feature changed the general configuration of copiers to the extent that there has never again been a true edge copier like the Xerox 4000.

In 1970, automatic density control (ADC) sensors were introduced with Xerox 4000 duplicators and subsequently used in various forms in the 5600 and 9200 families. Using the ADC sensors, somewhat frequent manual adjustments were made to the toner control

SPECIFICATIONS 
Copy speed (per minute)45. First copy after 7 seconds.
Paper tray1000 sheets. Two paper trays with 500 sheets each.
Output tray capacityn/a
Finisher/sorter
Staple function
Reduction/zoom
Document handler
Dimension and weight
Depth72 (cm) / 28 (inches)
Width83 (cm) / 33 (inches)
Height97 (cm) / 38 (inches)
Weight315 (K grams) / 695 (Lbs)
Floor space requirementsStationary: 2 x 2 (meters) / 7 x 7 (feet)
Movable: 1 x 2 (meters) / 4 x 5 (feet)

Do you have any more information about this model, or have brochures / pictures? Please leave a reply in the form below, or send an email to xeroxnostalgia@outlook.com

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Alberto Dekleva
Alberto Dekleva
May 29, 2020 6:32 pm

Técnico de 4000 en Rosario Argentina,máquina innovadora,al principio había problemas con los torrinton del transporte A,también con los rodillos que se ablandaba por el ozono .En Argentina las 4000 venían de Rank,no de USA,creo que era porque nuestra red es de 220v 50Hz

Lawrence Weiss
Lawrence Weiss
May 27, 2020 3:33 pm

Selling the Xerox 4000 in the early 1970’s in New York City was a challenge- it really jammed quite easily, and the rumor in the sales force was that the product was rushed out by Xerox to compete with the IBM Copier I and Copier II (which were plain paper also). Later on the Xerox 4500 was much more dependable- and displaced a lot of older 2400 and even 3600 models. And we sales reps carried around this template of the exact size of the 4000- it really was very compact and capable at the time.

George Sanders
George Sanders
February 9, 2020 5:57 pm

I worked 4000/5600 for 5 and a half years. Downtown D.C. to boot. Yes.. Bad knees and bad lower back

David Risik
David Risik
Reply to  George Sanders
April 23, 2020 4:10 am

Hey George, we shared the same parts drop… I worked on Copiers.

Barry Deeks
Barry Deeks
July 4, 2019 2:22 pm

I LOVED this product as it had a lot of new features that “groomed” techs for the bigger products. I was a Branch Product Specialist (BPS) and later technical Manager at our Cape Town South Africa branch, moving on to 9700s. Techs in SA had to be trained on the 4000 before being considered for 9400/9500 training. Many techs disliked the machine but as a team we mastered it. My senior technician could remove the A transport in 10 minutes flat. Later, when the machines went into workshop for refurbishing, holes were cut in the rear frame to replace the… Read more »

ronald lee bates
ronald lee bates
Reply to  admin
June 13, 2019 5:06 pm

i have a 4000 table cloth schematic was a tech on 4000s

Peter Struk
Peter Struk
Reply to  admin
November 5, 2019 4:36 am

I have a brand new drum in a tub, no box, anyone need one?

Joe Gallardo
Joe Gallardo
Reply to  admin
March 25, 2020 6:27 am

I have one !!!

mitch
mitch
November 30, 2018 8:55 pm

The Local University (Carleton) had made a special plaque on the wall with a 4000 fuser mounted to it and a nice overhead glued to it. Note said…’Another successful experiment in Fusion’.

Lee Garwig
Lee Garwig
February 27, 2018 2:17 am

K5-K8 retrofits were also lots of fun..not..

Jim Pennington
Jim Pennington
Reply to  Lee Garwig
July 24, 2018 5:44 pm

are there any of these machines still working? (Dumb Idea of the Year, I know) or even not working but sitting as historical objects?

james buzzard
james buzzard
February 23, 2018 5:47 pm

under #2 it was supposed to read yellow towel…

sorry

james buzzard
james buzzard
February 23, 2018 5:46 pm

I hated this product! After almost 4 years on Duplicators I was sent to these. in 6 months I was on disability due to lower back issues. My doctor figured out it was because the drum cavity was 1/2″ off the floor and the constant reaching and torqueing took its toll. A couple things always bothered me as well… 1. why oh why put exposure slot UNDER the drum, along with mirrors? hadn’t anybody in design ever hear of that new discovery… GRAVITY? 2. trombone reclaim was a joke. every one of them had a plug of yellow toner stuck… Read more »

Barry Deeks
Barry Deeks
Reply to  james buzzard
March 29, 2020 12:39 pm

A great machine that thought Technicians so much! Lead-edge stripper finger smudge could be avoided by simply adjusting the interdocument lamp timing so that the finger does not strike in a toner black band area. Advancing the stripper finger timing could help avoid drum damage in the image area. Finger smudge could also be caused by a faulty interdocument lamp switch / relay contacts which caused the lamp to go dim as the lead edge arrived. I am in Cape Town, South Africa and we had a team of technicians who mastered the machine and enjoyed working on it. Our… Read more »

Bob Easterly
Bob Easterly
November 5, 2017 12:51 pm

Early phase 4 machines were released before they were ready for market. Remember soldering in many polystyrene capacitors and frequent tripping breakers. Phase 5 model 4000’s was a major improvement. Bead chain recycling greatly reduced toner cconsumption but was a nightmare to keep it working. “Total Call – MARS – LOLOS” with critical adjustments returned many difficult machine back to good operation. The metal drum storage cans was great for canoe camping. Cleaned out Collapsible plastic developer containers had many uses. My dog loved to run after the black feed rolls. Yes – and be very careful not to have… Read more »

Herb Klug
Reply to  Bob Easterly
October 20, 2018 12:30 am

Is this the Bob Easterly I knew in Webster? I do not remember ever knowing you were a 4000 veteran! My first Xerox school was for the 4000 back in ’73… 45 years ago… Sure doesn’t seem like it. Hope all is well with you.

Joe Swaja
Joe Swaja
Reply to  Bob Easterly
June 18, 2019 2:53 am

Bob Easterly, sounds like a name from the early 4000 days in Webster. I recall you when I managed the 4000 LCE team for Phil Hyatt. It’s good to see you remember all the joys the 4000 provided to the Tech Reps. It did provide me with continuous employment on the Quality Improvement Team,

Wayne Irwin
Wayne Irwin
June 28, 2017 7:50 pm

I worked on the Xerox 4000 series for many years, starting very shortly after it was introduced. That was in Hartford, Connecticut, the branch that was the test branch before general release. Yes, it was a challenging machine to work on, but if you kept after it, and if you had good key operators, it was a very good machine.

Mitch
Mitch
May 1, 2017 10:59 pm

The trick was getting the dev. entrance chute to .008 inboard and outboard, along with the charge, transfer and detack wires. It could actually do fair solids! Take the rear exhaust fan and turn it backwards while taping the air filter to the back of the machine to filter air going into the machine. Mirrors kept collecting dust too quickly. Snipping the ends of the doctor blade to make them go thinner at the end foam gasket., kept toner from creeping down into the charge corotron. Final impression was that they put the prototype into production, as there wasn’t a… Read more »

Wayne Irwin
Wayne Irwin
Reply to  Mitch
June 28, 2017 7:53 pm

The biggest single improvement to overall copy quality was having the Vacuum box and stationary extension properly adjusted. using the electrometer for charge current adjustment was important too.

Ted Schulze
Ted Schulze
January 12, 2017 10:05 pm

I still suffer from two 4000-induced medical conditions: “4000 knees” and “A-transport replacement lower back pain”! Thankfully I don’t have toner lungs, and I was finally able to clean out my fingernails!
Oh yeah, also lucky to never get my fingers caught in the main drive chain!

David Wilkin
David Wilkin
Reply to  Ted Schulze
May 7, 2018 5:03 pm

But it sure demo’d well! 🙂

Ed Jones-Mack
Ed Jones-Mack
February 19, 2016 6:40 am

Correction in next to last sentence forefront set should read “corotron set”.

Ed Jones-Mack
Ed Jones-Mack
February 19, 2016 6:02 am

Thanks for the memories! In 1972, i was hired as a service tech by Xerox and trained on the 4000. It had a remarkable feature set for its time- auto-duplexing, automatic density adjustments, dual 500-sheet paper trays, and fast duplicating. From a service standpoint, it could be a beast: a woefully underpowered drum cleaning system (when the doctor blade wasn’t going bad, the recycling chain was locking up), a developer housing that required regular micrometer adjustments to keep from scoring the drum, and a complex forefront set, one of which would.occasionally spark and cause random logic malfunctions. As another said,… Read more »

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