Xerox 2300

Created: October 27, 2013 12:47 pm by Admin
Modified: July 14, 2017 8:38 am by Admin

The paper path inside the copier was quite simple. When the paper left the paper tray, a "gripper bar" with two clips opened and grabbed the paper and transported it under the drum, and through the fuser. The fuser unit was a heat roller and pressure roller, and the paper passed between the two rollers in order for the toner to melt into the paper.

The control panel consisted of the ordinary green Start print/copy button, and a wheel with quantity selector.  There was a display at the top/back end of the machine, where it showed symbols of ready and paper jam.

SPECIFICATIONS

 Dept

 Width

 Height

 Weight

 Floor Space Requirements (Meters/Feet)

(Centimeters) / (inches)

 56 / 22.1

 95 / 37.4

 33 / 13.0

 79 / 174 (K grams) / (Lbs) 

 2 x 2 / 6.6 x 6.6 (Meters) / (Feet)

Do you have any more information about this model, or have brochures / pictures, please leave a reply in the form below, or send an email to xeroxnostalgia@outlook.com

4 Responses

  1. Jim says:

    These were the result of a joint effort with Fuji Xerox, but were unreliable, featureless, and dirty. The release of this copier and the related 2350 marked the beginning of Xerox product decline, especially in the small-office space. Around this time Xerox gained a reputation, especially in the service force, of producing abject junk. The company never saw the old halcyon days again.

  2. Don says:

    CORRECTION:

    When the paper left the paper tray, a “gripper bar” with two clips opened and grabbed the paper and transported it under the drum, and through the fuser. The fuser unit was a heat roller, and pressure roller and the paper passed between the two rollers in order for the toner to melt into the paper. The heat roller had a light coating of silicon oil applied with a felt pad.

    The 2300 was a new machine with old design thoughts. They took the worst features from older models and incorporated it into their first metric design. The gripper bar came from the 1960’s 813 and the fuser system was similar to the 1970’s 2400 series.

    This definitely was not the decline of Xerox and they made many quality copiers after that time. The 2300 just wasn’t one of them.

    My 2300 is still running after 35 years but alas its end is near as I need a new drum and support is no longer available. Plus it’s now cheaper to just get a laser printer.

    I serviced everything from the original Haloid Flat Plate to the first automatic copier, the 914, up to the 2 copies per second 9500. In it’s day they were good machines and the 9000 series had many customers running 200,000 copies per month.

    • admin says:

      Thanks for your correction. I will adjust the text of this article on the 2300 and 2350.

    • Jim says:

      Don, within a few years of the time that this particular copier happened to be released, Xerox went from 80% market share down to 20 – 30%. Xerox was smoked by better japanese-made machines. They never came back, market share-wise.

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